ACCEPTING OUR HUMANNESS


ACCEPTING OUR HUMANNESS [April 3]

We finally saw that the inventory should be ours, not the other man’s. So we admitted our wrongs honestly and became willing to set these matters straight.

AS BILL SEES IT, p. 222

Why is it that the alcoholic is so unwilling to accept responsibility? I used to drink because of the things that other people did to me. Once I came to A.A. I was told to look at where I had been wrong. What did I have to do with all these different matters? When I simply accepted that I had a part in them, I was able to put it on paper and see it for what it was-humanness. I am not expected to be perfect! I have made errors before and I will make them again. To be honest about them allows me to accept them-and myself-and those with whom I had the differences; from there, recovery is just a short distance ahead.

From the book Daily Reflections
© Copyright 1990 by Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.

OUR GROUP CONSCIENCE


OUR GROUP CONSCIENCE March 30

“. . . sometimes the good is the enemy of the best.”

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS COMES OF AGE, p. 101

I think these words apply to every area of A.A.’s Three Legacies: Recovery, Unity and Service! I want them etched in my mind and life as I “trudge the Road of Happy Destiny” (Alcoholics Anonymous, p. 164). These words, often spoken by co-founder Bill W., were appropriately said to him as the result of the group’s conscience. It brought home to Bill W. the essence of our Second Tradition: “Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.”

Just as Bill W. was originally urged to remember, I think that in our group discussions we should never settle for the “good,” but always strive to attain the “best.” These common strivings are yet another example of a loving God, as we understand Him, expressing Himself through the group conscience. Experiences such as these help me to stay on the proper path of recovery. I learn to combine initiative with humility, responsibility with thankfulness, and thus relish the joys of living my twenty-four hour program.

From the book Daily Reflections
© Copyright 1990 by Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.

A.A.’s FREEDOMS


A.A.’s FREEDOMS  March 27

We trust that we already know what our several freedoms truly are; that no future generation of AAs will ever feel compelled to limit them. Our AA freedoms create the soil in which genuine love can grow. . . .

THE LANGUAGE OF THE HEART, p. 303

I craved freedom. First, freedom to drink; later, freedom from drink. The A.A. program of recovery rests on a foundation of free choice. There are no mandates, laws or commandments. A.A.’s spiritual program, as outlined in the Twelve Steps, and by which I am offered even greater freedoms, is only suggested. I can take it or leave it. Sponsorship is offered, not forced, and I come and go as I will. It is these and other freedoms that allow me to recapture the dignity that was crushed by the burden of drink, and which is so dearly needed to support an enduring sobriety.

 

From the book Daily Reflections
© Copyright 1990 by Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.

If You Blog It They Will Come


I was always told to share my story, So I started this blog

I have been sharing some of my of past and some of my thoughts on recovery but I never thought in a million years that there would be so many others out there that can relate to my writings.  I guess that is what I get for thinking. It is always nice to know that you are not alone and that there are others that feel the same way you do.

I take breaks to go and read other blogs that have been posted and shared  and I’m finding out more and more that I dont have to struggle as much as I do in being honest and sharing because I’m not alone. I’m truly grateful for all of my readers, followers, and commentator’s. It helps me to stay humble, blessed, and compassionate. So for all of my readers that have visited my blog  I’m  grateful for you all. Please keep sharing with me as this gives me hope.  It is always nice to hear some of your stories.

Never, ever did I think t that there was so many kind and compassion hearts in so many people and for this I just want to say ” I’m Grateful”.

God Speed my Brothers and Sisters

TBH

Gossip in Recovery


NOTE: My opinion does not reflect AA as a whole.

I’m only sharing my experience.

Lately my patience has been running thin with 1 particular person that I have been having to deal with. I have had to do a lot of work on myself to keep my peace and serenity from being thrown right out the window and going back to my old ways. I have been praying for this person and even tried making an amends just to keep my side of the street clean but that just completely blew up in my face and I just could not keep this person focused enough to just talk about us. Let me just say that some of us are sicker then others and I’m no better then anyone else but I do have really good tools that are a part of my life today. I find myself wanting to just remove myself from the situation. Now call it selfish and maybe it is but my sobriety is much more important to me today and being fed everybody’s business does not help me recover, I choose to focus on me and not to hang out with another person who continues to gossip, brag and drop names in the program. Today I can be honest with myself and sick is sick, there is no way around the gossip. On another hand I find some women being consumed by this persons sickness and I cant help them they have to learn on their own I have found in my experience that people don’t learn by being told, they learn by realizing. I had to get enough of it to realize that I needed to make changes.

Gossip is a number one killer in recovery and especially with women.
Gossiping about anyone means I’m still sick and still need to do a lot of work on me.

When you start working a 12 step program those first 3 steps change your life.

  • Step 1 – We admitted we were powerless over our addiction – that our lives had become unmanageable
  • First Step Prayer
    Dear Lord, Help me to see and admit that I am powerless over my alcoholism. Help me to understand how my alcoholism has led to unmanageability in my life. Help me this day to understand the true meaning of powerlessness. Remove from me all denial of my alcoholism. (This prayer is developed from the chapter, More about Alcoholism)
  • Step 2 – Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  • Second Step Prayer
    Heavenly Father, I am having trouble with personal relationships. I can’t control my emotional nature. I am prey to misery and depression. I can’t make a living. I feel useless. I am full of fear. I am unhappy. I can’t seem to be of real help to others. I know in my heart that only you can restore me to sanity if I am just willing to stop doubting your power. I humbly ask that you help me to understand that it is more powerful to believe than not to believe and that you are either everything or nothing. (p. 52:2, 52:3, 53:1, 53:2)
  • Step 3 – Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood God.
  • 3rd Step Prayer
    “God, I offer myself to thee – to build with me and do with me as Thou wilt. Relieve me of the bondage of self, that I may better do Thy will. Take away my difficulties, that victory over them may bear witness to those I would help of Thy Power, Thy Love and Thy Way of life. May I do Thy will always”.(63:2 original manuscript)
  • 12 Principles (“guides to progress”)
  • 1. Honesty & acceptance. (Self honesty brings acceptance)
  • 2. Hope. (Open-mindedness to the idea that we are not God)
  • 3. Faith. (Willingness to surrender to the process laid out before us)
  • 4. Courage. (Willingness to trust that God as we understood Him would see us through the difficult process of facing ourselves)
  • 5. Integrity. (Assuming responsibility for who we have become)
  • 6. Willingness. (Let go of the old and let God bring in the new)
  • 7. Humility. (Knowing who we are and now who we might become)
  • 8. Justice (mercy) and brotherly love. Brotherly love — doing right, forgiveness, understanding, taking responsibility for ourselves and others.
  • 9. Self-discipline and good judgment. (Acts of restitution)
  • 10. Perseverance, discipline and open mindedness. (Self acceptance)
  • 11. Awareness. (Seeking wisdom and God’s will for us) (Spirituality)
  • 12. Love and service. (Being available to those in need, gratitude in action)
  • By the 3rd step there is a transformation if you are working the steps with a sponsor and regularly attending meetings.Stick with the winners and not the gossipers, this means to hang onto the people around the tables that are working their program and not talking their program.Also if a person does not have a sponsor locally this is a red flag for those who are new if you cant get a sponsor locally then there is something wrong.